Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Aging & Gerontology
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Paul Langer

Twin Cities Orthopedics, USA

Keynote: The aging foot and its role as the foundation for healthy aging

Time : 09:30-10:15

OMICS International ICAG 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Paul Langer photo
Biography:

Paul Langer is a board certified podiatrist in practice with Twin Cities Orthopedics in Minneapolis. He is an adjunct clinical faculty member at the University of Minnesota Medical School and a past president of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine. He has authored Great Feet for Life; Foot care & Footwear for Healthy Aging. Served as an editor of two sports medicine texts and published five peer reviewed articles. He has presented more than forty academic lectures on topics ranging from lower extremity health to footwear and sports medicine.

Abstract:

By the age of 50 our feet have carried us an average of 75,000 miles. Research shows that the quality of life as we age is directly related to our ability to stay active. Foot pain, acquired foot deformities and the fear of falling are significant factors that limit activity in older people. Common age-related changes to the foot increase the risk of injury and falls. Even something as simple as finding a comfortable shoe can be problematic due to age-related changes of the foot. Based on a thorough review of the most recent peer-reviewed literature, this lecture will discuss how the foot changes with age and how to address the most common causes of foot problems through exercise, footwear changes and balance training.

Keynote Forum

Olivier Beauchet

McGill University, Canada

Keynote: Hippocampal volume, early cognitive decline and gait variability: Which association?

Time : 10:15-11:00

OMICS International ICAG 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Olivier Beauchet photo
Biography:

Olivier Beauchet has completed his doctorate in Neurology and Geriatrics (1995 to 2000) at Saint-Etienne University, France. In 2005, he obtained his PhD in “Human Motor Function and Disability”. He was appointed as a full Professor in 2008 at Angers University, France. He was recruited by McGill University in 2015, when he was appointed as the prestigious Joseph Kaufmann Chair in Geriatrics and the Director of the Centre of Excellence on Aging and Chronic Disease. Presently, he is a full Professor of Geriatrics at McGill University. He is a recognized world leader in research on age-related gait disorders.

Abstract:

In contrast to its prominent function in cognition, the involvement of the hippocampus in gait control is still matter of debate. The present study aimed to examine the association of the hippocampal volume with mean values and Coefficients of Variation (CoV) of spatio-temporal gait parameters among Cognitively Healthy Individuals (CHI) and patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI).A total of 90 individuals (47 CHI with mean age 69.7±3.6 years and 48.9% women, and 43 MCI individuals with mean age 70.2±3.7 years and 62.8% women) were included in this cross-sectional study. The hippocampal volume was quantified from a three-dimensional T1-weighted MRI using semi-automated software. Mean values and CoV of stride time, swing time and stride width were measured at self-selected pace with a 10m electronic portable walkway (GAITRite®). Age, gender, body mass index, number of drugs daily taken, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score, history of falls, walking speed and white matter signal-intensity abnormality scoring with Manolio scale were used as covariates. Patients with MCI had a lower MMSE score (P<0.001), a higher CoV of stride time (P=0.013) and a lower hippocampal volume (P=0.007) compared with CHI. Multiple linear regression models showed that CoV of stride time was specifically associated with higher hippocampal volume among CHI (P<0.05) but not among patients with MCI (P>0.650).Our findings revealed a positive association between a greater (i.e., better morphological structure) hippocampal volume and a greater (i.e., worse performance) stride time variability among CHI, but not among MCI individuals.

Break: Group Photo
Panel Discussion
Networking and Refreshment 11:05-11:25 @ Atrium

Keynote Forum

Jean-Claude Leners

Geriatric Centre Ettelbruck, Luxembourg

Keynote: Dysphagia in Elderly: A geriatric “unknown” syndrome?

Time : 11:25-12:10

OMICS International ICAG 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jean-Claude Leners photo
Biography:

Jean-Claude Leners is an responsible geriatric coordinator. He is a freelance medical consultant for the long-term care insurance and consulting geriatrician in a specialized nursing home for persons with dementia and geriatric consultant in the Hospice in Luxembourg (Haus Omega). Senior lecturer at the University of Luxembourg, since more than 18 years for a course: Introduction to medicine. JC Leners is the founding member of the Luxemburg Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics (ALGG) since 1985 and of the Luxembourgish Medical Association in Geriatrics (SSMLG) since 2010. Member and co-founder of the European Union of Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) and representative of Luxembourg.

Abstract:

Dysphagia in the elderly population is still an unknown and poorly detected syndrome. We would like to focus on three major aspects of this topic: Increasing prevalence in different pathologies: Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) affects up to 40% of the population who are 65 years or older. Aging causes changes in swallowing physiology and in frail, co-morbid and poly-medicated older people, the risk of swallowing dysfunction and OD increases. Prevalence of OD is higher in patients with neurodegenerative diseases andrnwe will focus more on persons with parkinson, stroke and/or dementia. Assessments: Swallowing is a highly complex process, involving complex coordination. Aging slows this process, increasing the risk for particles to be aspirated. Neurodegenerative diseases also affect swallowing coordination and function as do many classes of drugs. All older people need to be screened for OD in order to protect them against complications. There are simple clinical screening techniques that can detect the presence of OD and allow a quick diagnosis.rnTreatment strategies: Complications of OD in older patients are mainly malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia. Malnutrition is closely associated with frailty and commodities and is a result of the impaired efficacy of swallowing. Aspiration pneumoniarnis closely associated with poor oral health, frailty and is a result of impaired safety of swallow. To protect against these complications, patients require diet adaptation and protection against aspirations, a good oral health and strategies to reduce incidence of aspiration pneumonia is through rehabilitation techniques and sometimes with the help of medications.

  • Aging and Mental Disorders
    Aging and Bone Disorders
    Aging and Health
    Aging and Geriatrics
    Aging Care Management
Location: Flamingo 1
Speaker

Chair

Paul Langer

Twin Cities Orthopedics, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Olivier Beauchet

McGill University, Canada

Session Introduction

Fangyu Peng

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA

Title: Altered copper metabolism: A novel imaging biomarker in aging

Time : 12:10-12:40

Speaker
Biography:

Fangyu Peng has been graduated from Jiangxi Medical College, China as Medical Doctor and College of Medicine, University of South Florida, USA with PhD in Medical Microbiology and Immunology. Later on he obtained his postgraduate clinical pathology residency training from the Update Medical University, Syracuse, New York and nuclear medicine residency training from the University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut. Fangyu Peng is certified in clinical pathology by the American Board of Pathology and nuclear medicine by the American Board of Nuclear Medicine. Presently he is working as a nuclear medicine physician-scientist to practice clinical nuclear medicine and conduct translational research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at the Dallas, Texas, USA

Abstract:

Copper is a nutritional metal required for brain development and physiology. Disruption of copper homeostasis, either a copper deficiency or the accumulation of excess amount of copper in brain tissues, causes neurodegeneration and various symptoms of neurological disorders. Using copper-64 chloride (64CuCl2) as a tracer, age-dependent changes of 64Cu uptake in the brains of Tau transgenic mice and age-matched C57BL/6 mice were assessed noninvasively and quantitatively by a longitudinal Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) imaging study. Age-dependent changes of cerebral 64Cu uptake were detected in the mice, showing decreased 64Cu uptake in the brains of Tau transgenic mice at older age compared with 64Cu uptake in the brains of Tau transgenic mice at a younger age and age-matched C57BL/6 mice. The findings suggest that altered copper metabolism is a novel, promising imaging biomarker for noninvasive assessment of brain aging with PET/CT using 64CuCl2 as a tracer (64CuCl2- PET/CT).

Kimberly Forrest

Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania, USA

Title: Patterns and correlates of grip strength in older Americans

Time : 12:40-13:10

Speaker
Biography:

Kimberly Forrest completed her Ph.D of epidemiology from the Graduate School of Public Health at University of Pittsburgh 20 years ago. She has published nearly 50 research papers in the areas of aging, cardiovascular disease, women’s health, minority health, etc. Currently, she is a professor of public health and teaches epidemiology, biostatistics, international health and other courses related to public health.

Abstract:

Muscle strength is a sensitive indicator of morbidity and mortality in older adults. Decreased muscle strength contributes to decreased physical functioning. Hand grip strength is a simple measurement, yet it signifies total body muscle strength. The current study evaluated the patterns and correlates of grip strength among older U.S. adults. Data from the 2011-2012 National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were analyzed. Grip strength was measured using a digital dynamometer. Three tests were conducted for each hand, and the combined grip strength was used in the analysis. The SAS survey procedures were utilized to analyze the data. All analyses were based on the weighted data for a better representation of the U.S. population. This study included 1009 individuals (44.3% males) who were aged ≥ 65 years and had gripped strength measurements. Age distribution was 31.5%, 27.2%, 16.2%, and 25.0% for 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, and 80+, respectively. Race distribution was 81.1%, 8.3%, 7.1%, and 3.5% for Whites, Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians, respectively. The mean grip strength was 71.7 kg in males and 44.6 kg in females, declining with increasing age (p<.0001). After adjusting for gender, age, and race, having a lower body weight and not being in good health status were significantly and independently associated with decreased grip strength. These findings suggest that grip strength could be a useful indicator for overall health assessment in older adult populations.

Break: Panel Discussion

Lunch Break 13:10-14:00 @ Atrium
Speaker
Biography:

Julijana Chochovski is a Clinical Psychologist Registrar and is the head of research programs and Development for the Cairnmillar Institute. Educated at Monash University and the Cairnmillar Institute, she has many years of experience in working with psychological disorders in adults. Julijana’s broad research experience ranges from understanding the neurological impact of depression and moods, coupled with her current clinical research projects focusing on the therapeutic treatment and needs of older adults

Abstract:

One of the greatest social and economic challenges of the twenty-first century is the projected cost of looking after the increased numbers of elderly people. By 2056 Australia’s population is projected to increase to between 31 - 43 million people, with around 23% to 25% being 65 years or older (Attorney-General’s Department, 2010). Old age can present many challenges; the most obvious and documented is the decline in physical health. The aim of this study was investigate the role of; a sense of purpose, self-efficacy, sense of value and self-worth in predicting symptoms of depression in older adults. It was hypothesised that after 55 years of age, an increase in meaning in life would be dependent on having a sense of purpose, self-efficacy, sense of value, self-esteem and how these factors affect self-reported symptoms of depression. The participants were 114 Australian men and women over 55 years of age who were recruited from an older adult’s education group, S.A.G.E (Successful Ageing for Growth and Enjoyment). The participant’s mental health and depressive symptomatology were assessed using the following questionnaires; Meaning in Life Questionnaire (MILQ), Causal Uncertainty Scale (CUS), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES), Purpose in Life Scale (PIL), Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF), and the Short Schwartz’s Value Survey (SSVS). The results showed that high levels of self-reported depressive symptomology were associated significantly with a lack of meaning in participant's lives. The results also illustrated the significant negative association between depressive symptomatology and levels of a sense of purpose, self-efficacy, worth and a sense of value. The study provides strong evidence for building meaning, a sense of purpose, self-efficacy, a sense of one’s values and self-esteem in older adults as a prevention or treatment for depression.

Speaker
Biography:

Yvette Rose has completed her DNP from Governors State University, University Park IL. She is an Associate Professor of Nursing at Olivet Nazarene University, Bourbonnais IL. She has been serving as a member of Kappa Sigma Chapter and Lambda Lambda Chapter, International American Society on Aging and American Psychiatric Nurses Association. Her Honors Includes Includes American Psychiatric Nurses Association Board of Directors 2014 Student Scholar in 2014, San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC) Partners in Nursing Excellence in 2013 and Illinois Board of Higher Education Nurse Educator Fellowship Award Recipient in 2012.

Abstract:

Despite many veterans hopes that the invisible wounds of war can be healed, they leave scars. Most survivors of military combat who have experienced or witnessed life-threatening events, such as terrorist incidents and serious accidents, can adjust to life without lingering effects. Many years after a war, other aging veterans find themselves fighting a new battle as they strive to cope with Delayed Onset Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (DOPTSD). For other aging military veterans who have post-traumatic stress disorder, activities of daily living, particularly bathing, can be a stressful task. This scholarly project is an evidence-based bathing care standard created for family and direct care caregivers who have been experiencing the challenges to achieve “bathing without a battle.” This project translated the body of nursing science known as “bathing without a battle” for veterans who have dementia to those elderly male military veterans who have DOPTSD. Maladaptive behaviors such as kicking, biting, hitting, scratching, throwing objects, spitting and cursing were measured. Results reflected an effective means to improve the bathing experiences of veterans who have DOPTSD and who live in long-term care and residential settings. The routine and environment was changed implementing patient centered care interventions. The purpose is to see if these interventions would be able to assist veterans to better adapt to bathing, which will no longer be a battle. By changing the bathing routine and environment and caregivers, these veterans may be better able to adapt to bathing so that it will no longer be a battle.

Speaker
Biography:

Peter Bewert is a Registered Nurse who has worked in a number of high level roles across the aged care sector. He is a representative of the Australian National Aged Care Alliance, Nurse Administrator and Advisor for Aged Care Services, both advisory roles to the Australian Commonwealth. He has been influential in shaping policy regarding palliative care through expressions of the international Salvation Army and a speaker at national and international conferences. He holds a Bachelor of Nursing and Post Graduate Qualifications in Oncology and Human resource Management.

Abstract:

The model of care is based on a relationship-based, person-centred focus offered as a specialist care home for men, the majority of whom have a mental illness, history of incarceration/institutionalisation or homelessness, substance abuse and previous failed residential placements. There is a general reluctance to admit this cohort to mainstream aged care for various reasons (substance use/abuse, personal hygiene and compatibility). Further, some residents in the centre have come from the justice system, where disproportionate percentages are sex offenders; not always preferred candidates for residential aged care homes require placement. 150% of the current resident population at Montrose are managed through the Office of the Adult Guardian (Public Trustee) due to a history of incarceration or homelessness. With a basis in equality and empowerment, the model comprises a three staged, resident centric governance process achieving balance between dependence, interdependence and independence by: •Focusing on capabilities, not deficits •Fostering a shared understanding of importance in the residents day-to-day life, their current situation and the future they desire. Experience has shown the best relationships are reciprocal – thus, the centre philosophy is based on a collaborative, reciprocal and respectful relationship between the residents and care staff. This is vital working with people who have limited family and social networks. The care home is well respected as a unique and dynamic home with a focus on relationships and connection to others. Since implementing the model in 2013 there has been a reduced resident turnover rate within the home with fewer discharges related to decreased life expectancy or return to a homeless lifestyle. Residents experience an increased sense of contentment and community connect with the local community and residential community at the home.

Sharon Callister

The Salvation Army Aged Care Plus, Australia

Title: Person centred approaches in commissioning memory support units

Time : 15:30-16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Sharon has qualifications in Nursing, Business and Health Administration and graduated from the Australian Institute of Company Directors. She began her leadership journey at St.Vincent’s Hospital, followed by The Australian Red Cross Blood Service. In 2006, She secured her first CEO role with Benetas Anglican Aged Care Services. In 2008 she moved to Sydney to become the CEO for The Salvation Army Aged Care Plus where under her leadership she has developed it into a thriving $120m service caring for 1700 older Australians. With more to give, in 2012 She took on an additional CEO role to lead The Salvation Army Humanitarian Mission Services delivering a $75m Federal Government contract, managing welfare for Asylum Seekers at Nauru and Manus Island. Sharon’s leadership has been recognized by many and in 2012 was a finalist in the NSW Telstra Businesswoman of the Year and was included in the 2012 Westpac/Financial Review 100 Women of Influence Awards. She is also known to ‘run for her life’ in 250km ultra marathons that tests physical and mental endurance; qualities contributing to her successful leadership journey.

Abstract:

This presentation will focus on our model for families admitting their loved ones into a newly commissioned residential service. The person centered approach within our memory support units ensures that residents who require a secure environment as a result of significant cognitive impairment are cared in a manner which is holistic, provides opportunity to stimulate the senses and evokes a calming atmosphere. Our model and framework is focussed on individualistic needs of residents and attitudes of staff operating within a family / community framework. Evaluation has shown that key success factors are: •Initial set-up, training and mentoring of staff is critical and should be self-sustaining, (i.e., positive role-modelling at the ground level, education and setting standards of care and expectations of staff behaviour which creates a positive culture of care) •Continuity of staff encourages staff engagement. Staff feeling valued in their role is a key component to resident, representative satisfaction and quality of life. •Staff attitude – staff demonstrate a high level of respect for residents resulting in tangible physical, emotional and spiritual outcomes for residents. •A high awareness of individual resident's needs and resulting behavioural responses by staff towards resident's increases the bond of trust and co-operation, whilst meeting a deep emotional need for residents. •The creation of a homely, emotionally and physically safe environment which is individualistic in nature. •Involvement and inclusion of relatives in the day-today running and activities of the unit. •High levels of activities and the opportunity for residents to engage in familiar every day activities via sensory areas

Break: Panel Discussion

Networking and Refreshment 16:00-16:20 @ Atrium

Video Presentation @ 16:20-16:40

Mohammed Abduh Alshaqi

Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Saudi Arabia

Title: Adapting to death, dying and bereavement of geriatric palliative and end of life care

Time : 16:40-17:10

Speaker
Biography:

Mohammed Abduh Alshaqi is a Palliative Medicine Doctor. He did his MBBS from King Saud University 1992/1993, Arab Board of Family Medicine 2001, then Palliative Care from Canada and King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center at 2006 to 2008. He is now a Consultant and Head of Palliative Medicine, division of Oncology Department at Prince Sultan Military Medical City at Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In addition to that, he is a trainer and external examiner of Palliative Medicine of Saudi Commission for Health Specialties and Acting director of Saudi Society of Palliative Care since 2013 till present. He is a member of many Affiliation and Societies like the American Academy of Family Physicians and Saudi Society of Family and Community Medicine since 2001. In addition to that, he is a member of the Middle East Academy of Medicine of Aging (MEAMA) since 2003, member of International Association for Hospice and Palliative care since 2006, member of the Saudi Oncology Society since 2008, member of the Saudi Pain Society since 2009, member of Group on Educational Affairs (GEA) for Medical Education Research Program (MERC) since 2011, he is a member of the Arab Society of Palliative Care since 2014 till present.

Abstract:

Our fear of death and the loss of a loved one are two of the most monumental emotional challenges of human existence. This anxiety is usually suppressed and is only exposed when the reality of a possible death is confronted. Fear of death stems from different sources, for example the thought of our non-existence and the fear of the unknown of what lies beyond death. Palliative care has recognized the power of this suffering and is concerned with helping people cope and adapt. This is incorporated into a philosophy of care that has resulted in the principles of palliative care. In industrialized and technological societies, death has been removed from the family home into institutions with care provided by professionals. This has resulted in a lack of familiarity with the dying process, which may contribute to a fear of death and dying within the society. Death, dying and bereavement challenges the fundamental values and meaning of the human experience. Such a threat has the potential to provoke considerable distress and has therefore interested health professionals. It is important while providing care that we do not lose sight of the individual patient involved and the individuality of each experience of dying, death and bereavement. This presentation will review how to improve the understanding of the processes involved, the damaging consequences that can occur and the role of health professionals in caring for the dying and the bereaved.