Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Aging & Gerontology
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

Day 2 :

OMICS International ICAG 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Nicole Jane Brooke photo
Biography:

Nicole Jane Brooke is the Chief Executive Officer at Aged Care Consultancy Australia and has over 20 years of experience in aged care, retirement living and disability and holds a Clinical Associate Professor title with University of Tasmania in recognition of her international and national expertise in the sector. Nicole completed her PhD in aged care in 2010 at University of Technology, Sydney and resides on the the editorial board for the Journal of Palliative Care and Medicine. Nicole continues to develop innovative and leading edge support to organisations both in business optimisation and risk management, whilst specialisingrnin board and clinical governance, case management and leadership.

Abstract:

The philosophy of care is as central to organisational effectiveness, as are the values, vision and strategic plan. It creates a usable and practical foundation for all care interactions. To which one can enable effective communication, engaging synergies and evaluation of current and future needs across the organisation at every level. Mindfulness promotes the need to be present in the moment. The benefits of mindfulness include; improve quality of care and life, reduced anxiety, emotional stability, decreased incidence of depression, reduced stress, improved immune function, improved quality of sleep. Mindfulness is a state of being aware of what we are doing, how we are doing it, exploring more individual approaches for doing it, training our mind to be open to new opportunities and becoming more attuned to our own needs and the needs of our clients, team and partners. The foci of a core belief in mindfulness are the explicit need to find meaningful activities and develop relationships through autonomy, enablement, dignity, autonomy and privacy to name a few. The mind in mindfulness is about learning to mindful as opposed to mindlessness. Learning to be more effective, keeping an open mind, and actively participating in learning rather than just hearing or reading as we often become used to. Mindfulness speaks of the need to build a scaffold of knowledge and resourcing this adequately, rather than relying on a single point of contact or resource.

Keynote Forum

Win-Ping Deng

Taipei Medical University, Taiwan

Keynote: Recovery of Stem Cell Senescence By Platelet Rich Plasma To Delay Animal Aging

Time : 10:15-11:00

OMICS International ICAG 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Win-Ping Deng photo
Biography:

Win-Ping Deng obtained his doctorate in cancer biology Harvard University in 1993. Wing-Ping then joined the postdoctoral training at Jac A. Nickoloff’s lab where he directed research of preferential repair of UV damage in highly transcribed DNA and research of mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA intermediates of extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells. This led to the development of powerful genetic recombination analysis in mammalian cells. In 2000, he joined the faculty of the College of Oral Medicine at the Taipei Medical University where now he is the Distinguished University Professor and Deputy Dean at TMU. He pioneered a new research for combining stem cell and molecular imaging to study the cancer therapy or tissue regeneration.

Abstract:

Aging is a process related to loss of functional stem cell and then loss of tissue and organ regeneration potentials. Our previous result demonstrated that the life span of OVX-SAMP8 mice was significantly prolonged and similar to that of the congenic senescence resistant strain of mice after Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)/embryonic fibroblast transplantation. This study is aimed to investigate the potential of PRP to recover cellular potential from senescence and then to delay animal aging. We first examined whether stem cells would be senescent in aged mice compared to young mice. Primary Adipose derived Stem Cells (ADSCs) and Bone Marrow derived Stem Cells (BMSCs) were harvested from young and aged mice and found that cell senescence was strongly correlated with animal aging. Subsequently, we demonstrated that PRP could recover cell potential from senescence, such as promote cell growth (cell proliferation and colony formation), increase osteogenesis, decrease adipogenesis, restore cell senescence related markers and resist the oxidative stress in stem cells from aged mice. The results also showed that PRP treatment in aged mice could delay mice, aging as indicated by survival, body weight and aging phenotypes (behavior and gross morphology) in term of recovering the cellular potential of their stem cells compared to the results on aged control mice. We concluded that PRP has potential to delay aging through the recovery of stem cell senescence and could be used as an alternative medicine for tissue regeneration and future rejuvenation

Break: Networking and Refreshment 11:05-11:25 @ Atrium

Keynote Forum

Kimberly A Greer

Texas A&M University, USA

Keynote: The dog as an ideal model for aging biology investigations

Time : 11:25-12:10

OMICS International ICAG 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kimberly A Greer photo
Biography:

Kimberly A. Greer graduated from Texas A and M University, College of Veterinary Medicine, in College Station, Texas with a specialty in Molecular and Developmental Genetics. After working on neural tube defect genetics, Kimberly moved her focus to canine genetics during her post-doctoral studies. She established her own laboratory at Indiana University east following extensive study at NIH and Eli Lilly. Here, she discovered the genotype responsible for necrotizing meningoencephalitis, an invariable fatal canine disease. Following a laboratory move to the North Dakota State University to establish a Genomics Research Institute, She returned to Texas where she currently continues research into the genetics of aging at Prairie View A&M University.

Abstract:

With many caveats to the traditional vertebrate species pertaining to biogerontology investigations, it has been suggested that a most informative model is the one which: • Examines closely related species, or various members of the same species with naturally occurring lifespan variation • Already has adequate medical procedures developed • Has a well annotated genome • Does not require artificial housing and can live in its natural environment while being investigated • Allows considerable information to be gathered within a relatively short period of time. The domestic dog unsurprisingly fits each criterion. The dog has already become a key model system in which to evaluate surgical techniques and novel medications because of the remarkable similarity between human and canine conditions, treatments and response to therapy. The dog naturally serves as a disease model for study, obviating the need to construct artificial genetically modified examples of disease. Just as the dog offers a natural model for human conditions and diseases, our laboratory has established the canine correlates of human aging, demonstrating the size-longevity correlation in the domestic dog. Further, we have evaluated genotype and longevity gene associations within and between the canines of variable lifespan. Our biochemical studies demonstrate correlations pertaining to the GH/IGF-1 pathway, outlining surprising differences amongst the four genders within our canine population of greater than 77 pure breeds and mixed breed animals. Currently, evaluation of primary fibroblasts delineates correlations of size, longevity and oxidative stress resistance as well as oxygen consumption rates within the species.rn

  • Aging Biology
    Aging Case Studies
    Aged Care Services
    Aging and Disabilities
    Women and Aging
Location: Flamingo 1
Speaker

Chair

Nicole Jane Brooke

Aged Care Consultancy, Australia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Win-Ping Deng

Taipei Medical University, Taiwan

Session Introduction

Elizabeth Rodriguez Kessler

University of Houston, USA

Title: Literary constructions of “older” characters

Time : 12:10-12:40

Speaker
Biography:

Elizabeth Kessler has been graduated from University of Houston as a Doctor of Philosophy in English, with the concentrations including American Literature and Chicano literature. Later she pursued her interest in the use of culinary material in literature and ageing in literature and film. She has taught at California State University, Northridge, and she is currently at the University of Houston, Central Campus.

Abstract:

Beginning in the early 1980s with the persistence of Barbara McDonald, ageing gradually became not only of interest to, but also a serious topic for scholarly investigation and critique of Women’s Studies Programs. The growing body of knowledge about ageing was not however, limited to Women’s Studies, but continues to spread outside the field and to be an area of importance not only to women who have entered or will enter the "Othered" category that is old age” (Marshall vii) but also to men. Today, literary studies have produced criticism that interrogates the stereotypes of aging in works ranging from children’s stories to classic novels, poetry and drama. This article attempts to present a brief overview of how authors have sadly developed aging individuals with stereotypical characteristics that act as boundaries from which they cannot easily escape. Because these qualities are instilled in children’s minds from the time they have read fairy tales and learn to read independently, they grow up with a pre-conceived notion that older men are "helpless, incapable of caring for themselves and generally passive” Studies show that these ageist beliefs are perpetuated in children’s understanding as they age and as they read adult literature that continues to reinforce negative descriptions of older men and women. In this presentation, I will discuss characters in Hansel and Gretel, Rebecca, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock and Fences, examining the trajectory of the descriptions of men and women who have become “Other.”

Speaker
Biography:

Peter Bewert is a Registered Nurse who has worked in a number of high level roles across the aged care sector. Peter is a representative on the Australian National Aged Care Alliance and Nurse Administrator and Advisor for Aged Care Services, both advisory roles to the Australian Commonwealth. He has been influential in shaping policy regarding palliative care through expressions of the international Salvation Army, and a speaker at national and international conferences. He holds a Bachelor of Nursing and Post Graduate Qualifications in Oncology and Human resource Management.

Abstract:

Research in the United States of America has shown substantial benefits for consumer direction for persons of all ages, cultures and backgrounds who need long-term care. Further, the argument that consumer directed services are not appropriate for elderly persons with disabilities or for individuals with cognitive impairments has been debunked, with studies showing many elderly, individuals with disabilities and persons with cognitive impairments can express daily preferences for care and can benefit from consumer directed programs. As a provider of consumer directed care in home care packages, we are aware of the changes which occur when the locus of control moves to consumers, particularly those who have been financially or socially disadvantaged. However, implementing a unique CDC model into each of our centres will require innovation and flexibility in the type of services offered, as in the future, clients will be much more in control and will expect to have a choice. As an organisation, this means co-ordinated change is required in: •Care models •Organisational culture •Business processes The development of unique care models in our residential centres has commenced. At the Carpenter Court Aged Care Plus Centre with the development of a person-centred, resident directed behaviour support plan targeted at older people who have a mental illness with severe, persistently challenging behaviours. The model of care is evidence of our vision in action – our uncompromising commitment to all Australians, creating loving home and family environment which enhances health and spiritual well-being, whilst offering a home of peace and acceptance. Results have shown: •Increased occupancy (78% -99%) above the industry average of 93%. •Resident emotional well-being increased by 10%, with residents reporting a strong sense of belonging to the centre. •Maintenance of people with severely disturbed behaviours in the community- separations due to mental health problems decreased by 25%. •increased awareness of staff in resolution of aggressive behaviour; •stable staff establishment with a turnover well below industry benchmark 4; •decreased admissions to hospital; and •development of a sense of belonging in a caring community of peers

Break: Panel Discussion

Lunch Break 13:10-14:00 @ Atrium
Speaker
Biography:

Noelle Marie C. Javier MD is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. She received her fellowship training in both geriatrics and hospice and palliative medicine at the University of Michigan Health Systems in Ann Arbor, Michigan. She is a full time faculty in the clinician educator track in the Department of Geriatrics and Palliative medicine at Mount Sinai.

Abstract:

Progressive disability is a common but significant problem in the hospice and palliative care population as well as geriatric patients with chronic and life-long illnesses. It leads to depression, isolation, poor quality of life and overall increased caregiver needs, health care utilization, and institutional care. Contributing factors may include but not limited to disease progression, muscle deconditioning, surgical and medical complications, malnutrition, neurologic deficits, musculoskeletal problems, pain and non-pain symptoms, and active comorbid medical issues. Rehabilitation is based on function and has been conceived of in stages to include the prevention of disability, restoration to the premorbid state whenever possible, support to reduce disability, and palliation to reduce complications. There are supporting studies that attest to the role of physical rehabilitation improving function and quality of life for these patients. In fact, the fastest growing and rehabilitation-requiring population is adults over 65 years of age. Therefore, a thorough and inter-professional assessment of the patient’s medical, functional, and psychosocial status is critical in designing an appropriate and effective rehabilitation program. It is important to consider the patient’s goals and preferences, current level of disability, potential for improvement, and the availability and cost of resources before implementing a care plan. Rehabilitation can be offered in a variety of settings to include inpatient, sub-acute, outpatient, and the home environment. This oral presentation discusses the concept and benefits of physical rehabilitation as well as the role of physical, occupational and speech-language therapy as core rehabilitation interventions.

Speaker
Biography:

Heizel Mae A. Lucas is a graduating student from the University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Philippines under the degree program of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. The study was defended last November 2015 and they also won 1st place in the oral presentation for qualitative research entitled “Disseminating Research Output through Oral and Poster Presentation” which was held in the University of Santo Tomas last January 18, 2016.

Abstract:

Across the literature, impairment and disability among the elderly has been associated with a decline in meeting their special needs. Failure in meeting such needs may cause deterioration of function and threaten successful aging. Surprisingly, much of the literature has described successful aging of mostly males and those who are in health care institutions or living amongst society. The process of successful aging of older women who are incarcerated remain to be a blank spot in nursing research. Hence, this study purports to describe the process by which incarcerated Filipino female elderly experience successful aging. Strauss and Corbin’s grounded theory, design was employed in this study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to 15 purposefully selected incarcerated female Filipinos elderly from a penal institution for women in the Philippines. Further, data gathered was reduced to field text and was analyzed through open, axial and selective coding. Finally, truthfulness and trustworthiness of the findings were established through member checking. The study generated The Road to Success Model. Interestingly, five phases relative to successful aging emerged, namely: Struggling, Re-motivating, Reforming, Reintegrating and Sustaining. These phases describe how select female Filipino incarcerated elderly undergoes transformation towards successful aging. Similar to a road, each phase is considered a station one must pass through in order to get to the destination. The findings of the study serve as impetus for structural and procedural changes in prison, with a view to providing environment conducive to successful aging; and appropriate recognition for the elderly’s efforts to achieve successful aging.

Philip F. Daniels

University of Florida, USA

Title: Mental health implications of caregiver burden and role transition

Time : 15:00-15:30

Speaker
Biography:

Philip Daniels is a doctoral student in counselor education and earning a Masters in aging and geratric practice. He has a Masters in professional counseling and marriage and family therapy. His experiences include volunteer and professional roles working with clients in hospice, memory disorder units, mental health and rehabilitation units, and community agencies conducting individual or family interventions. Specific expertise’s include clinical practice and counselor education in the following areas: marriage and family therapy, dementia, caregivers of individuals with dementia, death and dying, end-of-life issues, grief and variations e.g. anticipatory & complicated, trauma, LGBT, substance abuse, and transcultural counselor competencies.

Abstract:

Dementia is on the rise: Caregiver’s are the “silent victims.” This workshop will provide an overview of mental health implications of caregiver burden and role transition. Mental health of caregivers will be explored through the lens of stress theory, role theory, grounded optimism, grief, communication skills, and coping skills. The need for help and support that individual and family interventions provide may improve the quality of life for the caregiver, which in turn may improve the quality of life for the care recipient. Specific mental disorders that will be covered include depression, anxiety, and substance use. With the movement of “aging in place,” there is an inevitable need to address the current rising needs of caregivers and individuals with dementia. Worldwide, dementia affects 36 million individuals; this number is on the rise. By the year 2050, it is expected to increase to 115 million individuals. In the United States, approximately 61.6 million caregivers provided in-home care in 2009. Being that this is unpaid work, there was an estimated cost $450 billion, which increased from $375 billion in 2007 (Robinson et. at., 2013; Chiao, et. al., 2009). Evidence points to a need for awareness, advocacy, and competencies as counselors help mediate the effects of caregiver burden. This presentation is multi-theoretical to capture the intersections of stress theory, role theory, grounded optimism, and speech accommodation theory in order to best serve clients in need.

Speaker
Biography:

Olivier Beauchet has completed his doctorate in Neurology and Geriatrics (1995 to 2000) at Saint-Etienne University, France. In 2005, he obtained his PhD in “Human Motor Function and Disability”. He was appointed Full Professor in 2008 at Angers University, France. He was recruited by McGill University in 2015, when he was appointed as the prestigious Joseph Kaufmann Chair in Geriatrics and the Director of the Centre of Excellence on Aging and Chronic Disease. Presently, he is a Full Professor of Geriatrics at McGill. He is recognized world leader in research on age-related gait disorders

Abstract:

Falls are highly prevalent among adults aged 65 years and over with prevalence estimated around 35%. Falls lead to injuries, hospitalization, loss of independence and social disability, which impose high costs to public health and social services. Identification of fallers, which is the first step of falls prevention strategies in older community dwellers, is therefore crucial for their efficiency and cost-effectiveness. There are complex interactions between host-related motor behaviors and environmental characteristics for the mechanism of falls. Due to the interplay between risk factors of falls, the prediction of falls remains difficult and depends on combinations of risk factors of falls. Over the past years, dual task-related gait changes have frequently been reported among older adults. However, published data are heterogeneous and show that impaired dual tasking is and is not associated with falls, or is even an irrelevant fall risk indicator compared to impaired single task performance. More recently it has been reported that Artificual Nerula Networks (ANN), using a set of clinical characteristics corresponding to the most commonly reported risk factors for falling, was an efficient way for the identification of recurrent fallers in older community-dwellers. Thus, these previous results suggest that ANNs could improve the predictive performance of the tools designed to predict falls. The aim of this presenttaion is systematic review all published data which examined the relationship between fall and changes in gait and/or attention-demanding task performance while dual tasking and to open a new perspective with ANN.

Break: Panel Discussion

Networking and Refreshment 16:00-16:20 @ Atrium

Poster Presentations 16:00-17:00 @ Atrium

Certificate & Award Presentations

Thanks Giving & Closing Ceremony